Local businesses lost: let the City know what businesses you miss or fear will close

easy-signOne of the downsides to rapid development is the loss of local businesses, often pushed out by new construction or rising rents. We’ve lost quite a few businesses on Queen Anne in just the past few years, and with more development on the way, we could lose more.

To help save local neighborhood businesses, Councilmember Lisa Herbold is proposing a Seattle Legacy Business Program with the mission of preserving the bars, restaurants, cafés, and shops that give Seattle its unique character and sense of community. The mission is simple:

Keep the Doors Open for Historic Neighborhood Businesses

Herbold is working with the Washington Trust for Historic PreservationHistoric Seattle, and 4 Culture for the proposed program, and it currently consists of three elements:

  • Survey community members to identify our most important business establishments
  • Identify elements that contribute to the culture, character, and history of Seattle
  • Establish tools to protect them

Screen Shot 2016-06-15 at 6.27.08 PMHow can you help save your favorite businesses? Or, let the City know what businesses are gone forever? Take the survey. It’s short – you can see the short list of questions to the right.

The survey results will help educate the City Council about businesses that may have escaped their radar – a true community-inclusion approach.

The results will be taken to the Mayor’s office, informing the Mayor’s Commercial Affordability Taskforce and its efforts to determine what policies and/or funding support may be necessary to preserve and protect Seattle’s iconic small businesses.

Let your voice be heard, take the survey today!

Survey on Restricted Parking Zones open through end of March

If you live in or near a Restricted Parking Zone, or use these areas to park around Queen Anne or anywhere else in Seattle, you can take an SDOT survey now through March 31st to provide input on these zones.

Restricted Parking Zones RPZ SeattleThe survey is fairly short and self-explanatory, and while you can indicate if you live in an RPZ or near one, you don’t have to park in one to take the survey and provide input.

Questions range from convenience to frustrations to impacts of the RPZ zones, as well as who should have permits and how many (e.g. how many parking permits per household).

The map to the above right shows the RPZs on Queen Anne, you can find out about city-wide RPZs at the SDOT RPZ Program website and find answers to common questions on this program overview page.

Walk? Take the Pedestrian Master Plan Update survey

We’re lucky to have local community organizations like Queen Anne Greenways to make sure our streets are safe for pedestrians. However, if you’re a pedestrian, you’ll have a vested interest in the Seattle Pedestrian Master Plan, the City’s approach to prioritizing pedestrian improvements across Seattle.

QA Ave N and Galer stairs to ChaseThe Pedestrian Master Plan Update survey is open now, and it takes about 5 minutes or less to complete it. It asks respondents to rate/rank the importance of different pedestrian improvements, from safe sidewalks to visible crosswalks (check out the almost-non-existent crosswalk at Queen Anne Ave N & Galer St to the right) to speed limits for cars.

The survey also shows a variety of different alternatives to traditional sidewalks that would be less expensive for the City to implement in areas where no sidewalks exist today.

Check out the survey today and let the city know what you think about different approaches to keeping pedestrians safe both on Queen Anne and in Seattle.

The Seattle Public Library is rebranding and seeking public input

The SPL logo and name will change –
check out the survey to see what’s proposed

The Seattle Public Library has kicked off a rebranding initiative, and it’s seeking public feedback  via a survey on the new name, three new logos, and a descriptive mission statement. I took the survey last night, it’s short and well worth your time if you have an opinion on the future of SPL.

“Seattle Public Libraries” is the proposed new name, and you can comment on how you feel about this name, as well as the traditional “The Seattle Public Library” name. Plus, you get a peek at 3 different new logos for the library, with an open-ended response to provide your thoughts on each logo – whether you like it or not, what you like/dislike about the proposed graphics and text, and general comments.

The branding initiative is privately funded by The Seattle Public Library Foundation, but it’s ultimately the community’s library – so speak up and voice your opinions in the web survey.

Survey input is due by 5pm on Sunday, October 11th – but don’t delay, take 5 minutes today to take the survey. You’ll be able to check out the new logos (they look very different) and mission statement, as well as let SPL know what you think of the proposed new name.

Provide your feedback to improve Queen Anne Community Center programs and activities

On of our local Queen Anne community groups – we are fortunate to have so many – is looking for feedback on the programs and activities offered at the Queen Anne Community Center.

QACC signQueen Anne Heart has launched a survey to collect information on the wants and needs of Queen Anne neighbors to help develop programs and improvements for the Queen Anne Community Center. The questions are simple, ranging from how often you use the QACC to the types of programs you’re interested in, and even what days and time would be most convenient for you.

You can take the survey online or drop by QACC to fill out a print version.

Queen Anne Heart is looking to transform the QACC into a “neighborhood hub” for residents. While there are many Queen Anne neighbors who use the QACC, there are also many who don’t – and getting feedback will help make QACC relevant to the community at large.

Take the survey today, it only takes a few minutes of your time!

Project HeronWatch needs your input

Did you know that Seattle’s largest colony of Great Blue Herons nests just one neighborhood away? Six months a year, the colony makes its home near Discovery Park. The nests are well hidden, so it’s often hard to spot them. However, the Heron Habitat Helpers is looking to change that and make the birds more visible to the public.

Project Heron WatchVia Project HeronWatch, the group is considering installing two remote viewing stations in the visitor centers at Discovery Park and at the Ballard Locks, where visitors can view the herons nesting and raising their chicks. The group is asking Ballard, Magnolia, and Queen Anne neighbors for input on these proposed stations.

You can take the survey today through September 15th. The Heron Habitat Helpers is trying to spread the word, so pass along the survey link to other individuals, groups, and organizations that may have an interest in these birds.

And, a bit of trivia for those who may not know… the Great Blue Heron is the official Seattle city bird. So, help them out and take the survey today!

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