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Queen Anne Historical Society hosts a free talk on Queen Anne apartments this Thursday

November 18th, 2014 by Laura

Narada Apartments

Narada Apartments,
photo courtesy of Queen Anne Historical Society

Walking around Queen Anne you can spot all shapes and sizes of apartment buildings – big, small, brick, or wood – some prominently featured along main arterials, others tucked into quiet spots in the neighborhood. If you’ve ever been intrigued by these various apartment buildings, this Thursday’s event is the Queen Anne Historical Society meeting for you.

QAHS is hosting a free talk at 7pm this Thursday, November 20th, entitled “Apartment Buildings and their Changing Impacts on Neighborhood Character” by Mimi Sheridan. According to QAHS, Sheridan’s master’s thesis is the “go-to source of information about the apartment buildings on Queen Anne’s south slope” – and she’s considered one of the most well-regarded preservation historians in Seattle. Plus, the event is free and light refreshments will be served.

QA Masonic Lodge

The meeting venue is also of note – it’ll be held at the historic Queen Anne Masonic Lodge #242 at 1608 4th Ave W.

One of the first buildings on Queen Anne, the structure dates back to c. 1905. It hasn’t always been a Masonic Lodge. As a former telephone exchange, the site hosted telephone operators who helped connect Queen Anne residents via the new-fangled technology of the day.

Clubhouse Interior

The Clubhouse Interior
Photo courtesy of The Clubhouse

The Masonic Lodge has undergone a rebranding as it opened its doors for events. “The Clubhouse on Queen Anne” can be rented for events, even providing catering and alcohol service for your events. The photos on its web site showcase a rich-but-cozy interior that you wouldn’t guess existed from the pale blue exterior.

Learn more about the apartments that contribute to Queen Anne’s character this Thursday and step back in time, all are welcome!

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Join the QAHS for a tour of modern architecture on Queen Anne

May 25th, 2014 by Laura

If you’re a fan of modern architecture and want to see striking examples on a guided tour, mark your calendars for Saturday, June 14th. The Queen Anne Historical Society is hosting a “Modern Queen Anne” tour that highlights Canlis and the Swedish Club, along with five recently completed new residential homes.

QAHS Modern TourThere are two versions of the tour available – one by car, one by bike. Pick your poison and join the QAHS to learn more about the mid-century architectural style embodied by Canlis and the Swedish Club, and hear from the architects of the five contemporary homes. Note – the tour is of the exteriors only, no interior access.

The bike tour begins at 1:30pm at the Swedish Club (1920 Dexter Ave N), the car tour begins at 2pm at Canlis (2576 Aurora Ave N). Refreshments (coffee and princess cake) will be provides at the Swedish Club for tour attendees.

Tickets are available via Brown Paper Tickets – $15 for QAHS members, $20 for non-members.

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Queen Anne Historical Society meeting on Thursday highlights Queen Anne Christian Church

March 24th, 2014 by Laura

QA Christian ChurchThis season’s Queen Anne Historical Society (QAHS) meetings have focused on local Queen Anne churches, and the tour de church is wrapping up this Thursday, March 27th, 7pm, at the Queen Anne Christian Church.

Build in 1911, the church is located at 1316 3rd Ave W at the corner of Lee and 3rd Ave W. The QAHS meeting begins at 7pm with a tour of the church by Pastor Laurie Rudel, highlighting the history of the church, its original structure and renovations, and its role in the Queen Anne community.

In addition to original 1911 architecture, the church includes a sanctuary from the 1950s that was remodeled in 2000 with an ear to acoustics – the sanctuary is a popular venue for concerts today.

All are welcome to attend the meeting and tour to learn more about Queen Anne history!

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Queen Anne Historical Society showcases Bethany Presbyterian on Thursday

November 19th, 2013 by Laura

As part of its ongoing series of presentations on historic Queen Anne churches, the Queen Anne Historical Society is holding its community meeting this Thursday at Bethany Presbyterian Church. The meeting begins at 7pm and all are welcome to join and learn about the “best kept historic preservation secrets” of the church at 1818 Queen Anne Ave. N.

BethanyAccording to the QAHS, the sanctuary has been taken apart and built again to meet today’s high seismic standards. Steve Stroming of RAFN, the project contractor, will explain the church’s retrofitting and preservation success story.

Church staff-member Sylvia Lidell will provide an overview of congregation history since the church’s founding 125 years ago this month. (Happy Anniversary, Bethany Presbyterian!)

The meeting is free and open to all members of the community, and light refreshments will be provided.

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Queen Anne Historical Society meeting highlights the history and architecture of St Anne’s

September 23rd, 2013 by Laura

This Thursday, September 26, the Queen Anne Historical Society (QAHS) kicks off its new program year with a public meeting at St Anne’s Catholic Church. This season, the QAHS is examining the architecture of churches on Queen Anne, and to do so, the free meetings will be held at the featured churches.

St Anne Church 1910

St Anne’s, c. 1910
Photo courtesy of QAHS

“The History and Architecture of St Anne’s Catholic Church”, includes a visit to the sanctuary, and talks by Parish Coordinator Ron Ryan and architect Stephen Lee. Ryan will review the church’s history and Lee will discuss the architecture of the current church, built in 1963 and renovated in 2008.

A discussion will follow, and coffee and snacks will be served. The meeting begins at 7pm at St Anne’s – the church entrances are at W Lee St on the 2nd Ave West end of the building and on the 1st Ave West end, directly across the street from the school stairs (directions here). All are welcome to attend to learn more about our neighborhood’s architectural history!

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Tour Mt Pleasant Cemetery this Saturday with the Queen Anne Historical Society

June 19th, 2013 by Laura

Have you ever walked, run, biked, or drove by Mt Pleasant Cemetery and wondered what lies within the cemetery walls? (well, maybe not as much as back when the laurels towered over the road, really obscuring the view) The answer is 40 acres with a rich history dating back to 1895, and you can learn more in a free walking tour of the cemetery this Saturday, June 22nd.

Mt Pleasant CemeteryIn addition to being one of the oldest cemeteries in Puget Sound, Mt Pleasant also boasts “one of the largest varieties of mature trees of any cemetery on the West coast”.

Plus, a roster of historical names that you can discover with the Queen Anne Historical Society this Saturday at the 21st Annual Mt Pleasant Cemetery Tour. Among the notable names, many were early Queen Anne founders and residents: pioneer Asa Mercer (yes, that Mercer); pioneers William and Sarah Bell, members of the Denny Party who arrived in Seattle in 1852; Nils Peterson, first homesteader of the Queen Anne area; and Rev. Daniel Bagley, the pioneer who gave Queen Anne its name.

Mt Pleasant mapLearn more about these early Queen Anne settlers, the 1906 S.S. Valencia Disaster, the 1916 Everett Massacre, and more in the 2 hour tour led by Kim Turner, the Queen Anne Historical Society’s Research Lead and historian of Mt Pleasant Cemetery.

The tour begins at 10am at the south entrance, west of the office. Dress for the weather (it’s supposed to be nice, again!), wear sturdy shoes, and learn what history can be found on top of Queen Anne.

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QAHS Photo of the Month: SIFF Uptown

June 17th, 2013 by Laura

It’s time for a monthly trip back into our neighborhood’s history, courtesy of the Queen Anne Historical Society. This month’s featured building is the SIFF Uptown Theatre.

SIFF Uptown
by Michael Herschensohn, President, Queen Anne Historical Society

For the second year running SIFF has centered its May-June festival at the Uptown, a name commonly given to American movie theaters. Ours is a rare case where the name has been taken by its surrounding neighborhood.

Uptown 1937

Uptown Theater 1937
Photo courtesy of Puget Sound Regional Archives

As the 1937 view shows, the building had only one theater.  As in many small movie houses, the second story shared restrooms to either side of a lounge. Behind them a narrow projection room with huge wheels of 35mm film that turned in front of extremely hot lights.

Uptown 2013

SIFF Uptown, 2013
Photo courtesy of Michael Herschensohn

Having grown into the space of the shops on its south side (remember le Tastevin?), the Uptown today has three theaters while the marquee installed in 1953 hides the lounge windows.

Not surprising, with 35mm film replaced by digital technology, the stove pipe that vented the heat of the projector light bulb sits idle. Otherwise, architect Victor W. Voorhees’ 1926 design has shrunk by some 234 seats to accommodate new bathrooms and a larger lobby.

If you’re interested in the history or Queen Anne, you can join the QAHS at individual or family levels online. The QAHS meets bi-monthly with programs about the history of Queen Anne, with the goal of preserving the heritage of our neighborhood.

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Annual Meeting of Queen Anne Historical Society focuses on Kinnear Park conservation

May 20th, 2013 by Laura

This Thursday, May 23rd, the Queen Anne Historical Society (QAHS) will be hosting its annual meeting at the Seattle Church of Christ at 7pm.

kinnear-park-1911

Kinnear Park, 1911
Photo courtesy of QAHS

In addition to brief QAHS business such as board elections, the meeting will spotlight the conservation efforts for Kinnear Park and the Southwest Queen Anne greenbelt.

Kinnear Park is located on the southwest corner of Queen Anne, and thanks to recent efforts by Friends of Lower Kinnear Park (FOLKpark) and Citizens for Off Leash Areas (COLA), it’s also now home to an off-leash dog park for Queen Anne (and visiting) canines.

Kinnear Park is one of several Queen Anne parks that were donated by residents, including Kerry Park, Marshall Park, Parsons Garden, and Bhy Kracke Park). As with our other Queen Anne parks, there are unique vistas to be had from Kinnear – views of Puget Sound can be had, and large champion trees fill the park with a rich canopy.

FOLKpark has been at the forefront of the revitalization of Lower Kinnear Park, and volunteers led by steward Howard Langevelt tend the Southwest Queen Anne greenbelt to the north. Howard and Debi Frausto of FOLKpark will join QAHS board members Holly Smith and Aaron Luoma to discuss the past and the future of the park and greenbelt.

Light refreshments will be provided and the free meeting is open to all. And, if you’re interested in the history or Queen Anne, you can join the QAHS at individual or family levels online. The QAHS meets bi-monthly with programs (like this one) about the history of Queen Anne, with the goal of preserving the heritage of our neighborhood.

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QAHS Photo of the Month: Alexander Hall

May 19th, 2013 by Laura

It’s time for a monthly trip back into our neighborhood’s history, courtesy of the Queen Anne Historical Society. This month’s photo features Alexander Hall, which you may recall from our post on its nomination for City of Seattle landmark status.

Alexander Hall, Seattle Pacific University

by Michael Herschensohn, President, Queen Anne Historical Society

Alexander-Hall-1910

Alexander Hall, 1910
Photo courtesy of QAHS

Queen Anne residents don’t often linger on the campus of Seattle Pacific University. If they did, they might discover Alexander Hall, one of the most charming brick buildings in Seattle.

Nominated for city landmark status just this past week, Alexander Hall may indeed be the oldest building in all of Queen Anne. It certainly is among the oldest surviving masonry load-bearing buildings in town.

Alexander Hall hunkers on the southwest corner of the elliptic drive known as Tiffany Loop on the west side of 3rd Avenue West.  Designed in 1891 by English-born carpenter/architect John Charles Parkinson (1861-1935) for the Free Methodist’s new Seattle Seminary, it was first called the Red Brick Building.

Alexander Hall Now

Alexander Hall, 2013
Photo courtesy of QAHS

In spite of radical alterations to its fenestration and entryways that show in the now photograph, the building’s four octagonal towers, projecting bay and round arch entrance make it an intriguing example of Richardsonian Romanesque Revival design.

Nils B. Peterson donated five acres of his kitchen garden for the seminary. Five of his children were among the first 12 students to attend classes when the building opened in April, 1893. Alexander Beers served as the school’s first principal while his wife Adelaide took charge of the academic side of things.

In 1940, the Red Brick Building was renamed in honor of the first principal, but Seattle Pacific College trustees, fearing malicious associations with his patronymic used only his first name.  In a very welcomed change of policy, Seattle Pacific University itself initiated the process to designate the building a city landmark.

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Have a beautiful garden you’d like to share? Enter your submission today for the QAHS Garden Tour

April 20th, 2013 by Laura

Last month we put out the call for nominations for the Queen Anne Historical Society’s garden tour. Perhaps it was a bit early, as mid-March wasn’t very spring-like – very little plants were blooming and the trees still looked naked without their foliage. However, it’s a month later, and neighborhood yards and gardens are literally springing to life.

Parsons Garden
Photo courtesy of QAHS

Perhaps you’ve noticed that your garden is looking particularly good as it starts to fill in, or you’ve been putting in a lot of up-front effort to get a spectacular show this year. Well, the Queen Anne Historical Society is still seeking nominations for a garden tour – so get your submission in!

The Queen Anne Park & Garden Tour is tentatively schedule for mid-May – assuming there are enough gardens nominated. So, take a look around this week, especially as the sunny weather moves in mid-week, and answer the call for submissions of private gardens and public spaces. The gardens don’t have to be immaculate nor do they need be historic, just spaces with great stories to tell.

Here’s the relevant info you’ll need to submit your garden:

  • Please submit one image that best represents your garden or public space and a short paragraph description of its history and why it’s important to you. Email your submissions to Aaron Luoma
  • Submission deadline: April 30th
  • The tour is tentatively schedule for the middle of May; dates will be published after April 30th.
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    QAHS Photo of the Month: the Black House

    April 16th, 2013 by Laura

    It’s time for a monthly trip back into our neighborhood’s history, courtesy of the Queen Anne Historical Society. This month’s photo features the Black House, a home that no longer exists today – although the site will be familiar to anyone who frequents Kerry Park.

    The Black House, W Highland Dr & 3rd Ave W
    by Michael Herschensohn, President, Queen Anne Historical Society

    Black House

    J.C. Black House, ca. 1940
    Photo courtesy of UW Special Collections (image UW13926)

    The J. C. Black House was built 1914 on the corner of W Highland Drive and 3rd Ave W facing Kerry Park. Its architect, Andrew Willatsen, trained in Frank Lloyd Wright’s Oak Park, Illinois office before moving to Seattle in 1907.

    The Black House embodied many of the characteristic elements of Wright’s Prairie School style, including the deep, overhanging eaves and the ribbon of windows along the front of the second story. Local citizens loved the house for its elegant beauty and its association with Willatsen and Wright.

    For many years, its owner thwarted efforts to landmark the house. Consequently, it had no protection under the City of Seattle’s preservation ordinance. The estate of Fred Tolan sold the Black House in 2003 for $2.3 million to Ken Woolcott, a Seattle investor who, shocking neighbors, tore it down over the three-day MLK weekend in January 2004.

    Kerry Park Court

    Kerry Park Court, 2013

    The lot remained empty for seven years. In 2011, the Kerry Park Court townhouses were completed and offered for $3.2 million each. Some of the townhouses remain on the market today.

    Seen in the lower center of both images, one small portion of the J. C. Black House garden wall survives to remind us of Andrew Willatsen’s stunning design and Frank Lloyd Wright’s early influence on Queen Anne. To learn more, visit the Queen Anne Historical Society website.

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    Find out more about parks and greenways at the Queen Anne Historical Society meeting

    March 25th, 2013 by Laura

    The Queen Anne Historical Society continues its series of guest lectures this Thursday, March 28th with a presentation by Becca Aue of the Seattle Parks Foundation. All are welcome to attend the free talk, which will be held at the Seattle Church of Christ (2555 8th Ave W) at 7pm.

    Photo courtesy of QAHS

    Becca Aue is the manager of the Neighborhood Parks, Green Connections and Strategic Project Initiatives at the Seattle Parks Foundation. She’ll be speaking about the organization and how it works to improve, expand, and connect parks, trails, and green spaces.

    She’ll discuss improvements that have been made to Queen Anne parks through the Parks Foundation and its sustainable development and stewardship of Seattle’s parklands. Included in the foundation’s current Queen Anne activities are the Uptown Triangle, Seattle Neighborhood Greenways, the Lake to Bay Loop, and the Cheshiahud Lake Union Loop.

    These projects all include large historically significant portions of Queen Anne. The west side of the Cheshiahud Lake Union Loop runs along the site of the first Seattle streetcar line and the new Lake to Bay Loop treks from Myrtle Edwards Park over the Thomas Street bridge, passing the landmark Seattle Center buildings.

    Join the Queen Anne Historical Society on Thursday to learn more about the Seattle Parks Foundation and discuss our own Queen Anne parks.

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