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Art exhibit features birds envisioned by three different artists

March 31st, 2014 by Laura

A new art exhibit at Stacya Silverman Art & Beauty features the beauty of our fine feathered friends – “Flocks, Murders, Gaggles and Coveys: A Celebration of Birds” opens this Sunday, with an opening reception on Sunday, April 6th from 1pm to 4pm.

The exhibit features bird photography by Judith Roan, mechanical birds that move and sing by Bliss Kolb, and birds on paper with dried leaves by Fred Martell. The show runs through June at the gallery located at 614 W McGraw St, Suite 101.

Here’s the rundown on the featured artists:

Mallard, preeningJudith Roan began seriously photographing birds in the early nineties when she started making weekly tallies of the birds she observes and studies on Mercer Island where she lives. Her photos are not merely studies of the birds in the area, but images that capture their routines, nature, and habitat. The song, movement, action and drama of the birds are carefully observed and recorded. The birds in her extraordinary pictures are all photographed here in the Pacific Northwest. Roan works closely with her photographer husband, Ron Reeder, and they often share work and images with one another.

Crowsm3Bliss Kolb has long been drawn to machines and the beauty of engineering, both of which are immediately apparent in his astonishing moving bird sculptures. For over 30 years, he has been designing and building cabinetry, award-winning theatrical sets, props, lighting and furniture. In 2010 he began pursuing a lifelong interest in Automata, or mechanical moving creatures. Kolb states, “Looking over the wonderful, clever works of automata throughout its history, the thing that continues to hook me is the imitation or illusion of life: an obvious machine that moves so realistically it seems to be alive”. Kolb was born and raised in Seattle and attended The Evergreen State College and the University of Washington, with additional training in musical instrument construction and clock repair.

Martell SongbirdFred Martell has been a resident of Manhattan’s East Village for the last 50 years. He studied design and architecture at Kansas State University, where he also studied theater. Fred collected leaves wherever he went, including leaves where he was born and raised in Vermont. He pressed and cured the leaves in phone books. No inks or dyes are used in creating his works. The color and detail that make up the beauty of the bird image is provided by cutting and assembling different leaves. His frames are hand-made from found objects and discarded scrap lumber. Martell’s work reflects the spirit of the arts and crafts movement as well as American folk art traditions.

For more information on the show, you can contact contact Stacya Silverman via email or at 206.270.9465.

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New Photography Show Highlights the Serenity of Green Lake

January 30th, 2013 by Laura

Buddhist Monks, 1999
Courtesy of Gary Grenell

A new collection of portrait photographs by Gary Grenell will adorn the walls of Stacya Silverman’s Art and Beauty gallery (614 W. McGraw) beginning this Sunday with an artist’s reception from 1pm-4pm. The show, Five Blocks to Green Lake, runs from Sunday, February 3rd through April 30th and highlights people that Grenell has photographed in his own Seattle neighborhood, where he lives just 5 blocks from Green Lake park.

Clarence Watson, 1998
Courtesy of Gary Grenell

The black and white photographs show a variety of people who visit Green Lake, and while it’s one of Seattle’s busiest parks, the settings for many of the images are serene and peaceful, not the hustle-bustle “on your right” that a sunny, crowded day at Green Lake conjures in most Seattleites’ minds. Instead, Grenell’s series “reflects his personal vision of this very public place” as a serene and peaceful private setting.

Three Teenage Girls, 2008
Courtesy of Gary Grenell

Works from Grenell’s Green Lake series were selected for the Portland Art Museum’s Flesh and Bone: Photography & the Body exhibition that just finished its run earlier in January. The Portland Art Museum also purchased two of Grenell’s photographs for its permanent collection. Six photographs from the Green Lake series are also in the permanent collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

Attend the artist’s reception this Sunday from 1pm-4pm to meet the artist and see his works in person. If you have any questions about the upcoming show, contact Stacya Silverman via email or at 206.270.9465.

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