New 7-story residential building planned for 320 Queen Anne Ave N

Screen Shot 2016-06-12 at 11.48.14 AMA 7-story building is planned to take the place of the A&A Printing at 320 Queen Anne Ave N. The current two-story print shop will be replaced by a residential building designed by NK Architects.

No preliminary plans or design drawings are available at this time. The 7-story building will house 66 residential units and two live-work units. It will also provide surface parking for four vehicles (no underground parking provided).

NK Architects has been the firm behind several of the newer Uptown/Lower Queen Anne developments including four residential multi-family buildings – Aperture on Fifth, H20 Apartments, Stream Uptown, View 222, and Fourth and Roy, It is also designed Galer 8 on Upper Queen Anne.

An Early Design Guidance meeting for this proposed project is set for Wednesday, June 29th at 8pm at the Queen Anne Community Center (1901 1st Ave W, Room 1). This meeting is open to the public.

Community meeting on new addition to Queen Anne Elementary this Monday

QAE frontQueen Anne Elementary is a recipient of funding from the Seattle Public Schools Excellence IV (BEX) Capital Levy. Seattle voters approved the levy in 2013, and now the community can learn more about how the funds will benefit Queen Anne Elementary.

The building originally opened in 1905 (and still has the original John Hay name on it) and was recently modernized for reopening as Queen Anne Elementary in 2011. As with many elementary schools in the area, Queen Anne Elementary is suffering from overcrowding. The $16.4 million in funding allows it to grow via an addition with 8 new classrooms (200 seats) and a new gymnasium.

The latest scope documents show that the scope of work will include, but is not limited to, the aforementioned classrooms and gym as well as, technology infrastructure, redevelopment of the site (bus, parking and drop off), covered walkways, an outdoor covered area, street frontage improvements, and the demolition of existing portable units.

Design work for the new addition and gym began in February of this year. Seattle Public Schools expects the construction to start in June 2018, with a planned 2019 opening.

If you would like to learn more, ask questions, or provide input on the project, attend a community meeting at the school (411 Boston St) this Monday, June 6th, from 6:30pm to 8pm. At the meeting, you can learn more about the project scope, schedule, and design.

 

Learn more about the Housing Affordability and Livability Agenda (HALA) and its impact on Queen Anne on Monday

 

Screen Shot 2016-05-14 at 3.26.12 PMIf you have questions or comments about the City of Seattle’s Housing Affordability and Livability Agenda (HALA), mark this Monday on your calendar. The Queen Anne Community Council is hosting a Land Use Review Committee meeting on Monday, May 16th at 7pm, with the sole focus on HALA.

The meeting is open to the public, gathering city hall planners, SDOT, residents and community leaders from Queen Anne, Fremont, Wallingford, Ballard, and Magnolia. The meeting will be hosted at the Queen Anne Community Center, 1901 1st Ave W.

The Queen Anne Community Council’s statement on HALA is as follows:

HALA is being promoted by city leaders as a lovely way to open the door to affordable housing in single-family neighborhoods.  But really, it’s a tool to cater to developers’ interests to over develop and choke our quality of life.  Taller height buildings with no parking are a problem already.  Zero-lot line backyard micro houses and over-the-garage apartments are more likely to become Air B&B rentals than low income mother-in-law units.  We need to stop this foolishness now and speak loudly that HALA guidelines to change the planning code in Seattle is not welcome.”

If you have concerns or questions about HALA and how it may or may not impact you and the neighborhood, plan on attending Monday’s meeting.

OP-ED: Councilmembers’ statement on ST3 Light Rail options

Below is an op-ed from Seattle City Councilmember Sally Bagshaw and King County Councilmember Jeanne Kohl-Welles, where they advocate for the “West is Best” option for light rail through Interbay. This proposal is for a light rail running 4 blocks parallel to 15th Ave West, crossing the ship canal via a tunnel.

There are other options, and it’s up to you to decide on what you prefer. The Councilmembers are seeking input and feedback, which you can provide via an ST3 survey or by contacting the Seattle City Council (click on Councilmembers to access their individual pages, where email addresses are provided) and King County Council.

Here’s the map of the ST3 section referenced in the Op-Ed below.

Screen Shot 2016-04-29 at 10.37.11 AM

*****

Light Rail to Serve Our Northwest Seattle Communities
Joint Op-Ed by Sally Bagshaw and Jeanne Kohl-Welles

Northwest Seattle voters will soon have an exciting opportunity to consider a ballot measure asking whether we will support a light rail line connecting Downtown to Ballard, with stops at South Lake Union, Seattle Center, and Interbay. The most recent openings of the Capitol Hill and University District light rail stations have brought Seattle into the 21st century of transit, and the coming wave of transit investments contained in Sound Transit’s next package, known as ST3, will revolutionize how we live and get around our region. This is a once-in-a-generation opportunity we must not take lightly.

The ST3 package, as it stands, proposes a second downtown tunnel, stretching from Royal Brougham Way to Elliott Avenue before the tracks move to street-level along 15th Avenue West, posing challenges to a critical freight, transit, and commuter arterial. As any of us who have attempted to commute on 15th from 4 to 7pm can attest, the traffic conditions are already untenable. We can only imagine conditions if two lanes are fully dedicated for rail. But what if the light rail route didn’t need its own lane on 15th Ave West? What if we could place it farther west, saving everyone who uses the corridor from ever-increasing gridlock?

Currently, the ST3 proposal suggests the line be at-grade, but that’s what this package is at the moment – a proposal. The Sound Transit Board of Directors, consisting of elected leaders from around the region, are currently accepting feedback before they make changes and ultimately send a final for voters to consider at the ballot this November.

The communities in our Northwest Seattle districts are deeply invested in shaping this plan, and have begun to speak with a united voice about how this plan can best serve our neighborhoods. The Northwest Seattle Coalition for Sound Transit 3 formed not months ago, and is composed of community leaders and more than a dozen organizations from Ballard, Interbay, Magnolia, Queen Anne, and Uptown. This group is gaining traction to advocate for the fastest and most reliable alignment.

The Coalition is advocating for an alignment we like to call the “West is Best” option. This proposal would run light rail parallel to 15th Avenue West (the equivalent of four blocks to the west) and cross the ship canal via a tunnel. This plan will ensure speed and reliability, preserve the existing lanes on 15th, and create an underground station in Ballard that would be the best option for future northern and eastern expansion.

Why should we make this kind of investment in the Downtown-Ballard line? The expected ridership in the Downtown-Ballard corridor is projected to be roughly 140,000, the highest of any sub-area in the entire Sound Transit region. It is critical this corridor is done quickly and done right. The Downtown-Ballard line will be a regional corridor—that is a fact. Our communities deserve infrastructure investments to meet the demands of regional ridership.

We have voiced our support for the “West is Best” option, and the coalition of voices continues to grow. Before the Sound Transit Board closes the public outreach period this Friday, let’s ensure they’ve heard our voices. Go to soundtransit3.com, fill out the survey, attend a community meeting, or send an email with your thoughts.

Imagine a 15-minute commute from Ballard to Downtown at 5:30pm on a weekday. While less time in traffic may mean less time to listen to public radio, we think it’s worth it.

Survey on Restricted Parking Zones open through end of March

If you live in or near a Restricted Parking Zone, or use these areas to park around Queen Anne or anywhere else in Seattle, you can take an SDOT survey now through March 31st to provide input on these zones.

Restricted Parking Zones RPZ SeattleThe survey is fairly short and self-explanatory, and while you can indicate if you live in an RPZ or near one, you don’t have to park in one to take the survey and provide input.

Questions range from convenience to frustrations to impacts of the RPZ zones, as well as who should have permits and how many (e.g. how many parking permits per household).

The map to the above right shows the RPZs on Queen Anne, you can find out about city-wide RPZs at the SDOT RPZ Program website and find answers to common questions on this program overview page.

Rezoning could bump planned Uptown 6 story building up to 8 stories

513 1st Ave N 8 storiesBack in June, we posted on three new planned multi-story projects planned for Uptown/Lower Queen Anne. Today, a Land Use Bulletin was released for the proposed 6-story building at 513 1st Ave N. An application has been submitted to rezone the lot to allow an 8-story building.

In June, the application was for a 6-story, 92 unit apartment building with parking for 45 vehicles. With the latest application, the number of apartments goes up to 105, and the parking goes down to 33 vehicles. Two more floors, thirteen more apartments, twelve less parking spaces.

The Uptown Urban Framework includes height increases for much of Lower Queen Anne/Uptown – see the map below. The Uptown Alliance meetings have covered the plan in many past meetings – if you are interested or concerned about the height zoning changes, look for the next Uptown Alliance meeting (info will be posted here) or contact the City of Seattle Senior Planner or Urban Designer, both listed on the main Uptown Urban Framework website.

Uptown Height Zoning

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