U-Pick Lavender Sale at Interbay P-Patch starts this weekend

lavendar interbayThis weekend kicks off two weekends in a row of the annual Interbay P-Patch U-Pick Lavender Sale. The P-Patch gardeners have over 14 varieties of lavender to cut, perfect for culinary uses, bouquets, potpourri, or just some simple purple beauty.

The P-Patch will have scissors on hand for cutting and ribbons for tying up bundles of lavender. Bundles cost $4 for a small bundle and $6 for a large bundle. The proceeds help keep the P-Patch going strong.

At the sale, you can also purchase lavender products such as wands, wreaths, sachets, and  lavender cookies.

Stop by the Interbay P-Patch at 2451 15th Ave W this weekend (July 2nd and 3rd) or next weekend (July 9th and 10th) between 10am and 4pm to pick some lavender and tour the Interbay P-Patch.

 

Queen Anne Historical Society kicks off free events this Thursday at the Queen Anne P-Patch

P-Patch signEvery year, the Queen Anne Historical Society (QAHS) hosts a series of free events centered on a single theme. Recently, the organization has covered apartment buildings and churches – and now they look to food for inspiration.

This year’s series looks at alternative food sources on Queen Anne, and it begins with the history of the P-Patch program on Thursday, September 24th. The event begins at the Queen Anne P-Patch at 7pm, which has an entrance at 2nd Ave N and Lynn St. (there is also an entrance at 3rd Ave N and Boston, but with limited parking)

P-Patch SWSusan Casey, founder of the Interbay Patch, one of the earliest P-Patches in Seattle, will share information on how P-Patch gardens work, as well as the history of the P-Patch program. Then, everyone will head a few blocks over to Queen Anne Manor (100 Crockett St) for a panel discussion on different ways Queen Anne residents have fed their family over the years.

Upcoming events in the series will cover Prohibition, the Great Depression, grocery stores, restaurants, and home kitchens on Queen Anne.

P-Patch with DahliasAll events in the series are free and all are welcome to attend. The P-Patches hit their summer glory about a month ago, but you can still see amazing dahlias, sunflowers, and the seasonal change as we move into fall.

You can learn more about the Queen Anne Historical Society via their website or Facebook page.

Tour Queen Anne Park with the Queen Anne Historical Society this Saturday

Tudors QAPAs I’ve noted in the blog before, I cover Queen Anne by foot (with dog in tow). It’s a lot of ground to cover, so I divvy it up into sections to make it more manageable. If you don’t live in Queen Anne Park, you may not know about it unless you’ve traversed the hill to check out the northwest corner of our neighborhood…

Queen Anne Park has wide streets that make looping curves instead of a grid, with large lots, and homes that date to the 1920s. While Queen Anne Park homes are from the same decade, there’s variation – Tudors, Spanish-style homes, and Colonial homes sit along winding streets (no grid!).

Spanish QAPQuite a few Queen Anne Park residents take advantage of the larger lots, with lush landscaping and gardens. If you’re a gardener or fan of gardens, take note: this walking tour includes a few gardens as well.

This Saturday, you can discover Queen Anne Park and learn more about its history from the Queen Anne Historical Society. QAHS will tour the neighborhood, as well as the aforementioned select gardens, before concluding with refreshments. Plus, the tour leader is Queen Anne Park resident, Florence Helliesen, so you can get the insider scoop.

According to Helliesen:

“There is a rich history in Queen Anne Park that I’m excited to share with our community. It’s a beautiful and unique part of the hill that often goes unnoticed. Our walking tour will tell an exciting story of real estate development as the roaring ‘20s drew to a close before the Great Depression.”

Turret House QAPThe curving street structure I noted above is not coincidence – the winding roads are designed to fit into the topography of the northwest slope, and many homes have views of the mountains – either the Cascades or the Olympics (some with both), Elliott Bay, and/or the Ship Canal.

The tour will cover three streets in Queen Anne Park – W. Etruria St., 10th Ave W, and Conkling St:

Queen Anne Park map

Tickets for the tour are $15 for QAHS members, $25 for non-QAHS members. You can purchase tickets online via Brown Paper Tickets. The tour begins at 10am on Saturday, August 29th, starting at the dead-end of W Etruria St (where 7th Ave W would be, it’s a SPU parking lot). If you drive to the tour, park at SPU’s Ashton Hall, entering at 5th Ave W and W Dravus St. Look for a gate that leads to W Etruria St and the tour starting point.

Learn more about some of Queen Anne’s hidden – or maybe not so hidden – treasures via the Queen Anne Historical Society, and join Saturday’s walking tour!

Gilman Gardens is hosting a beer garden and bake sale fundraiser this Saturday

Gilman Gardens satelliteWe’ve posted on Gilman Gardens in the past, and pretty recently too when they had plots available (and, heads up gardeners, there is still one available). Now, they’re planning a bake sale and beer garden to help raise funds for the community-run gardens at 2272 Gilman Drive West.

The event runs from 10am to 4pm at the Gilman Gardens this Saturday, July 11th, and everyone is welcome. Funds raised will help the gardeners at Gilman Gardens buy a water cistern – why is this important? Unlike official City of Seattle P-Patches, Gilman Gardens is all volunteer-operated, and there is no water plumbed to the site. Gardeners have to “bring their own” water, and the water cistern and soaker hose system will help them water them keep the community berry patch alive and available to everyone.

Gilman Gardens Sale

While the beer garden is 21+ only, the day’s events are also kid-friendly, with garden tours to teach both young and old about organic urban farming. Plus, the garden in on the route for Saturday’s Seattle Tilth Chicken Coup Tour, so there’ll be chickens too.

Gilman Plot signOnce an abandoned lot, Gilman Gardens was born in 2005 when neighborhood resident Charlie Hoselton asked the City of Seattle for permission to turn an abandoned SDOT lot into a community garden. Now, it’s a great place for gardening, hanging out, picnicking, and snacking on fresh, organic berries.

Any funds above and beyond what it takes for the water system will go toward a new picnic table. Stop by Gilman Gardens this Saturday, enjoy a beer, tour the garden, buy some baked goods and help support our neighborhood gardeners. Oh, and bring cash as it’s cash-only to partake.

Community garden Gilman Gardens has six plots available

Gilman Gardens satelliteIf you’ve ever walked, biked, or driven along Gilman Drive W, you’ve likely noted the colorful community garden in the median at Gilman and 13th Ave W.

The brainchild of founder Charlie Hoselton, Gilman Gardens broke ground in 2010 and is still going strong.

Gilman Gardens is a self-sufficient community garden, and similar to the City’s P-Patch gardens, it’s a great way to get your hands dirty with urban gardening and meet your neighbors at the same time.

Gilman Plot signRight now, Gilman Gardens has 6 garden plots available.  The plots vary in size and each has a yellow sign (see photo) marking them. You can check them out, but act fast, they’ll go quickly!

If you are interested one of the plots, contact Charlie via email to request one. And, happy gardening!

Help Picture Perfect Queen Anne keep our streets beautiful

PPQA BostonPicture Perfect Queen Anne is a community organization that keeps our major business intersections looking great with garden beds at the Galer Stairs landing and the corners of Boston St and McGraw St. Their efforts since 2009 have been key in keeping Queen Anne beautiful for residents and visitors alike.

Originally, the work was a collaboration between the community and the City of Seattle. Now, PPQA relies on support from the community to keep these gardens thriving.

PPQA is raising funds for 3 more years of professional watering and garden maintenance. Already, PPQA is halfway to its $20,000 goal via donations from neighbors and business owners.

They’re now asking for the community’s help – any donation is accepted, for example, if they can find 35 people to give $12 per month, they can raise the $10K. Their “35 to Help the Queen Anne Gardens Thrive” campaign is in full swing. You can pick up a flyer at the corner of Boston and Queen Anne Ave N to learn more.

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