Early enrollment at SPS begins Oct. 3

By Doree and Michael

Incoming kindergarteners and students of all grades who are new to Seattle Public Schools can get a head start on the enrollment process for next year starting on Monday. Early Enrollment goes through Jan. 31, 2012.

SPS enrollment facilitators will be at several Seattle Public Library locations and neighborhood community centers from Oct. 3-25 to help parents fill out forms and answer questions. You can also enroll your child during Seattle Public Schools’ Family and Community Symposium on Saturday, Oct. 15, at Garfield High School (interpreters provided).
Early enrollment allows families to avoid long lines during the busy spring and summer enrollment periods. While early enrollment does not impact where a student is assigned to school – under the new student assignment plan, assignment is based on the student’s home address – it is offered as a convenience to families, enabling them to get the enrollment paperwork completed ahead of time.
In addition, families who have students enrolling early – as well as existing students – will receive their school assignment notification in early 2012, prior to the Open Enrollment period in the spring. Students may apply to attend a different school of their choice during Open Enrollment.
The earliest enrollment is  5:30-7 p.m.,  Monday, Oct. 3 at the Ballard Library, 5614 22nd Ave. N.W. The Queen Anne enrollment takes place Oct. 25 at the Queen Anne Library at 400 W. Garfield St.

Enrollment times and locations are as follows:

At the market today: Surveys and a party

Photo courtesy of the Queen Anne Farmers Market

Today the Queen Anne Farmers Market is hosting its yearly market survey, so there will be no chef demo. But in the Music Tent from 5-7 p.m. will be this season’s final performance by Squirrel Butter and Ben Fisher, a local singer-songwriter.

The market survey will be conducted at the market from 3-7 p.m., and online at the market’s site, www.qafma.net as well as on the market’s Facebook and Twitter pages. The survey asks six questions about customer satisfaction.

The market steering committee is also having its annual wrap-up meeting with the City of Seattle today. The focus of that meeting will be figuring out how the market can wean itself from city grants. To that end, the city has granted the market funds to pay for a consultant who will work with market manager Jaime Collado on finding solutions that will bring the market sustainability.

Attendance figures show the market is growing, as the market is averaging 2,600 customers per event. The market had a customer-per-market increase of 77 percent from last year’s figures, Collado said. “And last year’s [2010] it was up 48 percent.”

At next Thursday’s final market of the season, there will be more music from local bands (the Squid Monks) and a chef demo from Rene Erickson of the Walrus and the Carpenter. One can still take the survey at www.qafma.net. At the end of the market, all market staff, vendors, volunteers and sponsors are invited to the year-end party at emmer&rye. The market is from 3-7:30 p.m. at West Crockett Street and Queen Anne Avenue North.

“We’re very proud of this year,” Collado said. “We’re ecstatic.”

Finale today Interbay Farmers Market

Today also marks the final market of the season at Interbay Farmers Market located in the parking lot of Interbay Urban Center, 2001 15th Ave. W., in front of the Interbay Whole Foods store. Interbay Farmers Market is open Thursdays, 3-7 p.m.

Mercer lane closures begin tonight

Beginning tonight and through Thursday, there will be intermittent land closures on Mercer Street as construction crews work on the Mercer Corridor project.

Up to three lanes of Mercer Street at Terry Avenue North and Boren Avenue North will be closed to accommodate gas-line installations and storm drain crossings at Mercer Street. One lane of traffic will remain open to vehicles at all times. The closures will happen from 7 p.m. to 5 a.m. The work is the first phase of the Seattle Department of Transportation’s attempt to ease congestion in the major corridor by making Mercer Street a two-direction street, improving pedestrian and bicyclist safety and access, improving connections among area neighborhoods, improving access to and from the Seattle Center and accommodating future transit investments. The project will also create a new northern entryway to the proposed viaduct tunnel.

Husband who stabbed wife still on the loose

Seattle police say the man who stabbed his wife last night in lower Queen Anne is still at large.

At 6:42 p.m., officers responded to a report of a stabbing in the 600 block of Queen Anne Avenue North near Roy Street. According to the preliminary police report, investigators found that a 24-year-old suspect stabbed a woman believed to be his wife. The suspect had fled the scene on foot and was gone when police arrived. Police searched the area using a canine unit but failed to locate the suspect.

The victim was taken to Harborview Medical Center and was treated for non-life threatening injuries.

Detectives are currently searching for the man who is described as a white male about 5-foot-8, with shoulder-length brown hair. A knife was recovered at the scene. No word yet on where the victim was stabbed. The View will provide updates as they come.

Seattle’s Most Beautiful Buildings

When we asked readers what they thought were the most beautiful buildings in Seattle, libraries, schools, churches, apartments and skyscrapers across the city were cited. But it was the subtle magnificence of the Magnolia branch of the Seattle Public Library that topped the list of Seattle’s most beautiful buildings.

Magnolia Library
The branch was designed by Seattle architect Paul Hayden Kirk and opened July 17, 1964.

In 2000, the Magnolia Community Club leveraged Opportunity Funds for a branch expansion for which construction began in 2007.

The $4.4 million renovation and expansion brought a new roof, new mechanical system components, technology, ventilation, electrical, computer connections and energy-efficient window glass. The architecture is considered an example of Northwest design with hints of Japanese influence.


So long, Bricco; hello LloydMartin

After five-plus years, Bricco owners Kevin and Tracy Erickson have closed the Italian-style restaurant atop Queen Anne hill.
The restaurant at 1525 Queen Anne Ave. N. is already being transformed by Seattle chef Sam Crannell into a new place called LloydMartin, which is named after his two grandparents. The new eatery will have 32 seats and is expected to open in October, according to a sign in the window. Crannell was the former chef at the short-lived Five Corner Market Bar and Kitchen in Ballard.
Crannell’s LloydMartin is touted as fine food at casual prices with comfort flavors, cutting edge techniques, premium ingredients and chef-to-guest interaction.

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