Weekend crime report: burglaries and car prowls

Posted on February 28th, 2011 by Editor


Is crime on the rise in Queen Anne? According to SPD’s crime statistics, no, but some Queen Anne residents have been noticing a trend – in crimes and in repeat targets. Stacey writes:

I live on 1st Ave W and Denny Ave (Lower Queen Anne) and was wondering if you guys are hearing of an increase in robberies. Our building alone has been hit 3 times this week, from mail boxes being pried open, to cars being vandalized and storage bins robbed, and then last night all the open unit lock boxers were stolen, which contain entry keys. They think all in all it’s been around 2-3 people over the past week, seemingly with full building access. I’m curious to know if other buildings are having the same problems…

Another reader, Brandon, wrote in with a different kind of crime to report, one not uncommon to residents on the hill. He writes:

My neighbor had his car broken into Thursday/Friday between 11pm and  10am. There weren’t any signs of forced entry, though, which was  surprising to both of us. In addition to his stereo face plate being  stolen, every shred of paper including his garbage bag and his car’s
manual was taken. Sounds like the beginnings of an identity theft. This happened near W Emerson St. & 12th.

Have you noticed an uptick in crime in Queen Anne lately?


  • Annoyed

    My boyfriend lives on 4th Ave W and his car was broken into, while parked in the “secure” gated garage over the weekend. They broke the drivers side window and took the 12 year old stereo and nothing else.

  • Annoyed

    My boyfriend lives on 4th Ave W and his car was broken into, while parked in the “secure” gated garage over the weekend. They broke the drivers side window and took the 12 year old stereo and nothing else.

  • McGinn is an empty suit

    Get used to it. No budget for prevention, and now cops scared to do routine patrolling because of backlash over brutality. Further down the drain goes Seattle.

  • McGinn is an empty suit

    Get used to it. No budget for prevention, and now cops scared to do routine patrolling because of backlash over brutality. Further down the drain goes Seattle.

  • Duh.

    As much as it sucks having your car broken into, there’s common sense as to not leaving anything in there! Like of course your duffle bag, laptop, and cellphone will be stolen if it’s in your car.

  • Duh.

    As much as it sucks having your car broken into, there’s common sense as to not leaving anything in there! Like of course your duffle bag, laptop, and cellphone will be stolen if it’s in your car.

  • Jason

    A few days ago someone smashed the window on my car and stole the owners manual.

  • Jason

    A few days ago someone smashed the window on my car and stole the owners manual.

  • Batty

    threefold problem:
    drug additions, need to steal to get drugs
    not enough patrol cops
    leaving your valuables in plain view in the car

    the first 2 are very expensive to solve, so it’s up to each of us to not entice thieves with addictions…

  • Batty

    threefold problem:
    drug additions, need to steal to get drugs
    not enough patrol cops
    leaving your valuables in plain view in the car

    the first 2 are very expensive to solve, so it’s up to each of us to not entice thieves with addictions…

  • Dave_on_3rdW

    As a block watch Captain, I look at crime trends in the area on a monthly basis. The rate doesn’t seem to be notably increasing. I did have someone come jiggle my door knobs at midnight last week (I was home and awake at the time), but it was partially my fault for being targetted: I left my garage door foolishly open, and my car unlocked to boot (braint fart!), so someone was hoping the keys were sitting on the kitchen table.

    We all need to be vigilant and enure that we do what we can to not attract attention. It really is not a government agency’s job to protect us; the police are spread thin, and in reality 95% of what they do is investigate crimes that have already occurred. Preventing crime by not attracting attention, and taking charge of or our own safety, should be the individual’s responsibility first and foremost.

    Bad things happen to good people, and the “it will never happen to me” mindset is what tends to get in the way of being vigilant.

  • Dave_on_3rdW

    As a block watch Captain, I look at crime trends in the area on a monthly basis. The rate doesn’t seem to be notably increasing. I did have someone come jiggle my door knobs at midnight last week (I was home and awake at the time), but it was partially my fault for being targetted: I left my garage door foolishly open, and my car unlocked to boot (braint fart!), so someone was hoping the keys were sitting on the kitchen table.

    We all need to be vigilant and enure that we do what we can to not attract attention. It really is not a government agency’s job to protect us; the police are spread thin, and in reality 95% of what they do is investigate crimes that have already occurred. Preventing crime by not attracting attention, and taking charge of or our own safety, should be the individual’s responsibility first and foremost.

    Bad things happen to good people, and the “it will never happen to me” mindset is what tends to get in the way of being vigilant.